The Fallglow Cabled Cowl – FREE Crochet Pattern

Amelia
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I don’t know about you, but one thing that I really look forward to with the changing of the seasons is changing out my closet. Even if the weather hasn’t actually started to change much yet, getting different clothes out and imagining the quintessential days of the season coming up is so much fun.

At the same time, the cooling season of fall means that it’s easy to get outside again and enjoy the softer temperatures. Afternoon walks with more gentle sunshine coming through colorful leaves often creates a pinkish glow, and everything feels more cozy and pleasant.

With this sort of nostalgic feeling in mind, the Fallglow Cowl design(and the matching beanie that will be coming out soon as well) was created to celebrate this comfortable season as well as the beauty of it’s changing light and landscape. I hope you enjoy it!

Find more: 17+ Cowl crochet pattern collection.

The Fallglow Cabled Cowl - FREE Crochet PatternPin Pin

The Yarn


The yarn for this design is the “Bold” yarn from Sugar Bush Yarns. This extra-fine Merino Wool has turned out to be the perfect choice for the Fallglow designs.

The Bold yarn has a smooth and consistent twist that really allows three-dimensional stitches to stand out. The cables and bobbles in the Fallglow cowl are really set off by this yarn’s texture. But, despite the great twist, this yarn is also particularly light and lofty. In fact, between such a soft and spongy yarn and all of the cables in this design, the “squish” factor in the final product is kind of unbelievable!

The final reason that I personally fell in love with this yarn for the Fallglow Cowl was the color.

I wanted a nice soft pink of some kind, both because of the peachy light I like so much in the fall leaves, and because pink is just such a nice color, period. This “Pacific Peach” colorway in the Sugar Bush Bold yarn has turned out to be just the right mix of pink and neutral. As it happens, this color also reminds me of certain varieties of pink pumpkin!

There are 30 gorgeous shades of this yarn available, and it comes in 3.5oz balls. To check it out for yourself, you can see it HERE.

And now, without further ado, let’s take a look at the design itself:

The Fallglow Cabled Cowl - FREE Crochet Pattern Pin

ABOUT THE FALLGLOW COWL


This design was actually inspired by a knit project. A few years ago, I had a commission to knit two scarves, and one of them I made with cables. Since my client wanted a cowl, or circular scarf, I decided to knit the piece like a normal long scarf and then sew the ends together.

With the cables worked to go around the cowl lengthwise and with my work almost long enough to join the ends, I thought it would be really cool to try giving my scarf a seamless look. By ending my cables at just the right place in the pattern for the ends to match up with the beginning, perhaps it could work.

Well, it turned out looking really good! Not only did my client like the result, but other knitters commented that the seam of the scarf was hard for them to see without having it pointed out. It seemed that my “seamless” cable design had been a success!

I’ve been excited to try this same concept with a crochet project, and this Fallglow set is the result. Although not totally invisible, the seam in this cowl brings the pattern repeat together nicely if done according to this pattern. The cowl uses uses the entire repeat of cable stitches four times and really sets off the bobble accents. A matching beanie can also be found on my site, ameliamakes.com. Using this pattern, you can certainly make a longer scarf and not join the ends, but just keep in mind that a longer scarf will use more yarn.

A slightly more complex cable pattern plus some bobbles has created a design with a lot of visual interest. I’m excited to share it with you and hope that you enjoy it as well.

Since you like the Fallglow Cabled Cowl, these might interest you too?

The Fallglow Cabled Cowl - FREE Crochet Pattern Pin
The Fallglow Cabled Cowl - FREE Crochet Pattern Pin

How Long Does It Take To Crochet That?


How long it takes to crochet something varies depending on your skill & how fast you crochet. But that isn’t a helpful answer is it?

Well, I’ve developed a yarn calculator to help you get the answer to this question.

It will help you calculate exactly how much time you’ll spend crocheting a project.

All you need to know is how much yarn you will use on the project in either meters, yards or skeins. Then crochet your test square & time it.

Calculate how long it takes to crochet this project(or whatever you happen to be working on!). 

THE FALLGLOW CROCHET COWL – THE FREE CROCHET PATTERN


Pattern Options


The pattern below is written for a one-size-fits-all cowl. However, you may certainly choose to repeat the pattern more times and turn this into a normal scarf, with or without a border on the sides. Just keep in mind that such a scarf would need more yarn and time to complete

GRAB THE PDF ON ameliamakes.com!

About The Pattern


The Fallglow Cowl is meant to be a one-size, cozy pattern for any chilly time of the year. The cables and bobbles are very eye-catching and it’s quite warm when worked up in wool.

As for time, I would estimate that this will take several afternoons to make, at least. This is mainly due to the more complex design, but it is worth it! In fact, once you do the first repeat of the pattern it will probably start to go more quickly as you get familiar with the pattern.

The Fallglow Cabled Cowl - FREE Crochet Pattern Pin

Project Level


Intermediate Skill Level

Read about skill levels.

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MATERIALS NEEDED FOR THE FALLGLOW COWL


Crochet Hook

Size 5.00 mm / US: H / UK: 6

Yarn

Yarn used:

Sugar Bush Yarns – Bold yarn in color 3008(Pacific Peach). This is an aran weight yarn that is as lofty and squishy as some chunky yarns.

Yarn amount used: 

I used about this much for the Fallglow cowl: 2 balls / 7 oz / 200 g / 412 m / 450 yards

Yarn characteristics:

  • Weight is a 4/medium or aran yarn
  • 100% Merino Wool

Other Materials Needed

  • Tapestry needle for weaving in your ends
  • Yarn scissors
  • Stitch markers(optional): I think stitch markers may help you keep track of the pattern repeats or also help with seaming up the ends when you are done crocheting the main body.

Gauge


Measured with hdc crocheted in rows

14 stitches & 10 rows per 10 cm /4”.

The Fallglow Cabled Cowl - FREE Crochet Pattern Pin

Notes 


  • When referencing different stitch numbers, I am talking about looking at the front of the work, from right to left.
  • In this design, the cable are worked on even-numbered rows to make the front. Odd-numbered rows are always worked in hdc.
  • This crochet pattern is written in US terms.
  • All measurements given are unblocked.
  • Note that measurements are given as exact as possible. But crochet tension & technique might give variations in the result, that changes from person to person.
  • Read pattern instructions carefully before beginning to make sure you understand everything. It might save you hours frogging your work & crocheting it again!
  • I highly recommend you work a swatch of 4 x 4 inches using the stitch the gauge is given for. If your swatch matches the gauge, you’re good to go. If the gauge is wrong, you might need to change your hook. Go up in crochet hook size if your stitches are smaller & go down in crochet hook size if your stitches are bigger (more details). In this project, exactly matching the gauge is not strictly necessary, but it is still wise to check and adjust if you are off significantly.
  • Check yarn info if you want to find an alternative or test your yarn against the gauge. Learn more about substituting yarn.

Size & Measurements


It should be noted in this case that a little variation in dimensions is perfectly fine.

Width: The whole cowl measures 11 inches wide as the main pattern is worked. The final width after adding a bit of ribbing is approx 12.5 inches

Length: After repeating the pattern 4 times, the cowl body will measure approximately 30 inches long. This length is then joined at the ends and becomes the main part of the cowl.

Abbreviations

We try our best to include all crochet abbreviations in the list above for the crochet pattern, but sometimes we may forget one or two.

Learn more about crochet abbreviations & find a complete list on our Crochet Abbreviations & Terms post.

Stitches You Will Need 


Front Post and Back Post stitches(in hdc to make ribbing)

Double Treble Stitches worked in the front and back post.

Techniques You Will Need


Crochet Cables, Ribbing:

To make crochet cables in this project, FPdtr stitches are worked in front of hdc stiches and anchored around other stitches from previous rows. Front post and back post stitches are also used to make ribbing around both ends of the cowl once the ends are joined.

The Fallglow Cabled Cowl - FREE Crochet Pattern Pin

VIDEO TUTORIAL:


Step by step video tutorial.

Fallglow Cabled Cowl Pattern Instructions


Main Cowl Body

Row 1: Ch 39 and do a row of Hdc for row 1 OR do a row of 38 foundation Hdc stitches(this is what I did). If you choose to work foundation stitches instead of starting with a chain, insert the hook under both top yarn strands to get the most solid effect whenever you work another stitch. I like this method because it gives better stretch.

Ch1 and turn here and at the beginning of each new row.

Row 2: hdc5. Skip two stitches and FPdtr around stitches 8 and 9 row 1. Now, go back and FPdtr around stitches 6 and 7 from row 1, from the front(your last two FP stitches will be on top).

Note: after you work front post stitches(in other rows as well as here) I find it extremely helpful to look behind those stitches to the tops of the stitches from the previous row. This helps me make sure that start in the right place to work the hdc stitches again.

*hdc8. Skip two stitches and FPdtr around stitches 20 and 21 from row 1. Now, go back and FPdtr around stitches 18 and 19 from row 1* repeat once more, putting FPdtr stitches around stitches 32,33 and 30,31 from row 1. Hdc 5.

Row 3: Hdc all stitches.

Note: when you get to your cabled stitches, there’s a trick you can use to close up the holes created by the cables. Instead of just working your Hdc stitches into the tops of the cable stitches, also work it into the back loop of each slipped stitch. Simply pick up the back loop right before inserting your hook into the top of the corresponding cable stitch. This also helps to keep the top of the work nice and even. As a bonus, it also makes the cables even more squishy!

Row 4: Hdc 3. Skip 2 stitches and FPdtr around the next two stitches (also fpsts) from the last pattern row. (You should be working around the two stitches in the back, which were worked into stitches 8 and 9 from row 1 ). Hdc 4, and then “skip back” to  FPdtr around the other two fp stitches from 2 rows ago.

*Hdc 4. Skip 2 stitches and FPdtr around the next two stitches (also fpsts) from the last pattern row). Hdc 4, and then “skip back” to  FPtr around the other two fp stitches from 2 rows ago. * repeat once more. Hdc3

Row 5: Hdc all stitches

Row 6: hdc1, FPdtr the next two stitches around the ones from two rows ago. Hdc3, and then work a cluster bobble in the next two stitches:

Cluster Bobble:

For this pattern, I’m working a bobble into two stitches so that it stays centered. Since I find that the tops of the stitches in these kinds of bobbles tend to get rather lost in cinching the bobble together, I’m adding a stitch on either side(again, to keep the bobble centered in the space between the cables).

So to do this, start by chaining1. Hdc 3 stitches into each of the next two stitches. Take the hook out of your work, slip it through the top of the first Hdc you did, pick up your stitch, and draw the whole group together with a ss at the back of the stitches. Now end with another ch1. This should leave you with a nice raised bobble.

Now to continue row 6: Hdc 3, *FPdtr the next two stitches into the FP stitches 10 and eleven from row 4.

FPdtr the next two stitches into the FP stitches 16 and 17 from row 4.

Hdc3, work a bobble in the next two stitches, Hdc3* repeat once more(working the FP stitches appropriately).

Now FPdtr the next two stitches into stitches 34 and 35 from row 4. Hdc1

Row 7: Hdc all stitches

Row 8: hdc1, FPdtr the next two stitches into FP stitches 2 and 3 from row 6. Hdc8.

*FPtr the next 2 stitches into stitches 14 and 15 from row 6. Then, work behind those to work the next two FPdtr into stitches 12 and 13 from row 6. Hdc8* Repeat one more time with the appropriate stitches for the FPdtr stitches.

After that, work 2 FPdtr around stitches 36 and 37 of row 6. Hdc1.

Row 9: Hdc all stitches.

Row 10: Hdc 1. FPdtr into stitch 3 from row 8. Then, go behind that stitch to work a FPdtr into stitch 2 from row 8. Hdc 6 .

work 2 FPdtr into stitches 12 and 13 from row 8. Hdc4 and then work 2 more FPdtr into stitches 14 and 15 from row 8. Hdc 4

Work 2 FPdtr into stitches 24 and 25 from row 8. Hdc 4, then work 2 more FPdtr into stitches 26 and 27 from row 8. Hdc6.

FPdtr into stitch 37 from row 8, then work behind that one to work another FPdtr into stitch 36 from row 8. Hdc1.

Row 11: Hdc all stitches.

Row 12: Hdc 1. FPdtr into stitch 3 from row 10. Then, go behind that stitch to work a FPdtr into stitch 2 from row 10. Hdc 6 .

*FPdtr two stitches into the FP stitches directly below them in row 10. Hdc4* repeat twice more.

FPdtr two more stitches into the FP stitches directly below, and then hdc6. Finish by working a FPdtr into stitch 37 from row 8, then work behind that one to work another FPdtr into stitch 36 from row 8. Hdc1.

Row 13: Hdc all stitches.

Row 14: Hdc 1. FPdtr into stitch 3 from row 12. Then, go behind that stitch to work a FPdtr into stitch 2 from row 12. Hdc 8.

*FPdtr the next two stitches into stitches 10 and 11 from row 12. Then, FPdtr the next two stitches into stitches 16 and 17 from row 12. Hdc8* Repeat once more with the appropriate stitches for your FPdtr stitches.

Finish by working a FPdtr into stitch 37 from row 12, then work behind that one to work another FPdtr into stitch 36 from row 12. Hdc1.

Row 15: Hdc all stitches.

Row 16: hdc1, FPdtr the next two stitches into FP stitches 2 and 3 from row 14. (Not twisting).

*Hdc3. Make a bobble over the next two stitches the same way we did in row 6. Hdc3. FPtr the next 2 stitches into stitches 14 and 15 from row 14. Then, work behind those to work the next two FPtr into stitches 12 and 13 from row 14.*Repeat one more time with the appropriate stitches for the FPdtr stitches. Hdc3, Make a bobble, Hdc3. Finally, work 2 FPdtr around stitches 36 and 37 of row 6. Hdc1.

Row 17: Hdc all stitches.

Row 18: Hdc3.

*FPdtr  the next two stitches into stitches 2 and 3 from row 16. Hdc 4 and then FPdtr  the next two stitches into stitches 12 and 13 from row 16. Hdc 4* repeat twice more times, except Hdc 3 at the very end instead of 4.

Row 19: Hdc all stitches.

Row 20: Hdc 5.

*FPdtr the next 4 stitches into stitches 4,5,10, and 11 from row 18. Hdc 8.* repeat twice with the appropriate stitches from row 18, and only Hdc5 at the very end of the row.

Repeat Pattern

Repeat rows 1-20 three more times(for four times total or 80 total rows).

Seaming up

Without cutting your yarn, fold your work in half with the wrong side facing outward. Line up the two ends of your work as well as you can.

At this point, you could slip stitch the two edges together through the tops of your stitches and get a very nice join. However, this still leaves a break in the cabled pattern from the right side. To get a more seamless appearance without doing much more work, we’re going to use a slightly different technique, but still work in slip stitches. Before you begin though I recommend joining the two edges together at the cables so that you are sure you’re lining up your stitches correctly. Some kind of locking stitch markers or even safety pins work well for this.

Starting where your working yarn is, Work all of your slip stitches below the top section of the stitches that you are connecting. You can either work through the body of each stitch, or you can also place your hook more in between your stitches. Either way should work fine.

Just make sure that you keep your stitches lined up and use the same tension that you’ve used while you were making the cowl- you don’t to seam up your cowl too tightly..

When you come to the stitches that are cabled in your last row, I would suggest slipping the back of those skipped stitches at the same time (whether or not you’ve been doing it the whole time). This will reinforce the stitches the same way that we have for all of the other odd-numbered rows.

When you are done, take a look at your work from the right side and make sure you are satisfied.

Ribbing

After seaming up, you can go right into working a couple of rows(I did two rows on either side) of 1×1 ribbing around the edge of your cowl. Then, do the same on the other edge. Use FP and BP Hdc for your ribbing, placing them in the most natural places. My cowl has about 84 stitches in each row of ribbing going around the edge.

Fasten off & cut yarn.

Finishing Weave in ends


When you’re finished crocheting you should have the main cowl body seamed up with ribbing on both sides. At this point, the only thing left to do for finishing is to weave in your ends!

The Fallglow Cabled Cowl - FREE Crochet Pattern Pin

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My crochet patterns can be used to sell handmade pieces. You are required to credit Joy of Motion/Janne Kleivset as the designer by linking back to My website: https://joyofmotioncrochet.com. You can not use my pictures when selling your handmade items. Finally, you can not resell, reprint or share any parts of my patterns as your own.

Amelia

Amelia

Amelia Makes. Guest Designer.

From a young age, Amelia found solace in crochet and now shares her passion through her blog, Amelia Makes. Drawing inspiration largely from nature's beauty, her designs reflect her profound admiration for the outdoors. Through Amelia Makes, she aims to assist women, particularly mothers, in crafting exquisite projects for themselves and their loved ones.


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